Research: Planned obsolescence in technology products

http://www.tested.com/tech/689-planned-obsolescence-is-modern-tech-built-to-last/

Two types of planned obsolescence- designed to break or designed to become outdated.

Behaviour of consumers also contribute to obsolete products- Products will go out of fashion and we therefore want whatever is the greatest and most up to date technology.

Products that don’t physically break down are usually software products that require updates or upgrade to a new product, but do some of these products really need upgrading?

https://i0.wp.com/www.teacherclick.com/flash8/graficos/logo_flashmx2004.jpg

https://i0.wp.com/img.p30download.com/software/image/2013/06/1372503620_adobe-flash-professional-cc.jpg

I have used both Macromedia Flash and the updated Adobe Flash CC. Macromedia Flash 8 is 10 years old and it still has very similar features that’s still used in Adobe Flash. The new changes include the new interface design and minimal new features that could benefit specific users such as improved HTML publishing and Sync settings, but is it worth paying £550+ for this?

You have to anyway because chances are that the computer you used to use the software has now broken down so that’s at least £600+ for a descent machine to run the software. But keep in mind that you can’t reinstall old software that you’ve already purchased. So that’s another £500+ to upgrade to the new software. Regardless of choice or not, is £1000+ worth it?

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